Should you get your car serviced at an auto shop or a dealership?

Sometimes we just want you to read what other people are saying about topics like this. Don't let us influence you and always do your own research. We are always here to talk and will give you the best advice we can. We hope you find this useful.

Dale

Original story and post on lowestrates.ca by Dominic Licorish

As far as I’m concerned, cars are magic. I know they have transmissions, drivetrains, horsepower, and all those other things they say in commercials, but as to how they all fit together and work? Don’t know, don’t care, and I’m sure many people who own cars don’t either.

If you don’t know how to fix your car, someone else is gonna have to do it. Generally speaking, that means finding an auto repair shop, and those come in two flavours: independent and dealership.

Which one is best for you?

We got in touch with Mark Whinton from the Carquestions Youtube Channel and asked him for advice to help drivers make a choice on whether they should go to a dealership or mechanic (and summarized the answers in a chart below for you lazy folks).

“In most cases, you’re going to go to the independent mechanic. It’s just more financially viable. Dealers have higher targets, so prices are usually higher. That’s just how it is.” said Whinton. On top of that, he told me that those higher prices don’t necessarily come with higher quality service.

“No matter where you go, you’re likely to get the same quality of service,” he said. Though, he did also acknowledge that dealerships can be a better solution for luxury models like Mercedes-Benz and BMW because, they’re most likely to have training, as well as access to parts and equipment that are specifically meant for your car.

So, here are a few questions Mark Whinton says drivers should ask themselves when deciding where to take their cars for service.

1. Has there been a manufacturer recall for your vehicle’s issue?

2. Is your issue covered under your vehicle’s warranty?

3. Does your vehicle require special parts, repair tools, or techniques?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, chances are you should go to a dealership.

Dealerships cover recall and warranty repairs at no cost to the owner and therefore should be the first solution to consider if your vehicle has an issue. Whinton says he’s seen people spend thousands on repairs they could have had done for free if they’d known. If your vehicle has a problem, verify if the problem falls under your warranty and go to the Transport Canada webpage for a comprehensive guide on checking for vehicle recalls.

Some independent mechanics go out of their way to be able to service luxury and/or rare vehicles, but it’s not very common. So if you answered yes to question #3, you’re most likely going to have to go to a dealership (but there’s no reason not to check the options in your area).

If you answered “no” to all of these questions, chances are you’re better off going to an independent mechanic. Whether it’s general maintenance (brake job, oil changes, tire changes, etc.) or a special issue (leaks, rattling noise in engine, dashboard warning lights), independent mechanics generally offer better prices than dealerships.

  Dealership Independent
There has been a manufacturer recall for your vehicle  
Your vehicle is still under warranty  
Your vehicle needs hard-to-find/proprietary parts  
Your vehicle has a special issue (leaks, rattling noise in engine, dashboard warning lights)  
Your vehicle just needs general maintenance (brake job, oil changes, tire changes, etc.)  

“I don’t think this is a binary question”

That’s the first thing Zain Manji, co-founder and chief operating officer of mobile auto service company Fiix, told me when I asked where drivers are better off getting their car serviced. In his eyes, either one can be good options depending on the professionalism, expertise, and transparency of the person working on your car. The right choice, he says, is to go the shop that can best meet all of those qualities while still fitting your budget.

“Many shops and dealerships don't always have the most qualified individuals working on your car. Many actually utilize apprentices to do the majority of the work, since apprentices need practice, hours, and are a lower cost option for them. At the same time, there are many shops who aren't transparent with their customers and who use fear tactics in order to up-sell their customers.”

Whether you choose a dealership or an independent shop, you can still get bad service. You never really know what’s going to happen to your car when you leave it with someone. A driver in Mississauga recently figured this out after mechanics at a dealership took his Mercedes out to get coffee.

Manji says the key to finding an excellent mechanic is to look for:

  1. A great track record and glowing reviews.
  2. Transparency from the company on who the mechanics are, what their qualifications and expertise are, and why they are great.
  3. A customer base which they've formed great relationships with. Strong word of mouth and loyalty is a great sign.

7 Driving Techniques You Should Learn from a Race Car Driver & Why

Original Post by Auto Loan Solutions

Driving your conventional 4-door sedan may not seem to have anything in common with the experience of driving a $10 – $15 million Formula 1 (F1) car. The former is for average folk, while the latter is for the exceptionally gifted drivers out there, and it’s fair to assume all racing skills are only useful for race tracks. But they’re not worlds apart. In fact, there are a number of driving techniques you can learn from a race car driver, that will help make your daily drive to work or those summer road trips better. Not only are they good for improved performance, they’re actually great for your safety as well.

  1. Use your eyes like a camera

Let’s start with your eyes and brain here. On the track, a race car driver uses his or her eyes like a film camera, capturing different “shots”, primarily focusing on what’s far ahead of them or where they want to go. They’re not fixed just on what’s directly in front of them.

This is an important skill for you as a driver. Too many people fix their eyes on the car ahead of them, rather than the flow of traffic in the distance. For a race car driver, doing so means putting yourself in a bad position. For you, that could mean ending up in a serious or fatal accident. Keep this in mind: your brain needs time to process the road conditions ahead, and you can only do so if you have time to see what’s taking place beforehand. That calls for looking into the distance, not the foreground.

  1. Brake “left-footedly”

Like the left hand, you have individuals who use their left foot more than their right. Some of the best race car drivers are in this category, preferring to brake with their left foot. Braking with the left significantly reduces the time it takes to slow down, which of course, is vital at times when driving. The reason for this stems from the fact that your left foot is closer to the brake.

Drivers of race cars need to often decelerate from speeds of 250km/h to 80km/h around sharp corners, so quick braking is essential. For the average citizen, quick braking matters not for the finesse of turning around bends (although it is impressive), but to avoid losing control of your car or prevent a rear-end collision. A second can mean the difference between escape or impact. Braking with the right usually wastes that precious fraction of time, which often translates to a distance of 30 – 50 feet travelled. Left-foot braking, however, cuts that time down by several seconds. In turn, you stop much faster than you would with traditional braking.

  1. One move at a time

For some odd reason, a lot of drivers think the busier they are behind the wheel, the better their driving skills are. They believe the constant steering, braking, accelerating and shifting of gears makes them more skilled since they’re able to multitask so well. They are mistaken. Watch a race one day – the occasional dash cam footage will show a level of stillness you may have not noticed before. The driver is usually focused on turning the wheel.

They maintain this focus to avoid losing control of their cars. Anytime they accelerate, brake or steer, there is the potential of breaking traction, which isn’t always desirable. A loss of traction is something you certainly don’t want as a driver, especially when the roads are slippery due to rain or ice. Unless you have refined chops as a racer yourself, you’ll want to maintain a smooth and steady drive by focusing on one thing at a time, without steering or braking/accelerating too hard.

  1. Grip the wheel…and pull

Here’s a strange tip: don’t just grip the wheel, pull it. Race car drivers practice this weird little hack to gain superior control of their steering. So if the driver has to turn left, for example, they’ll pull down with their left hand (or if making a right, they’ll push down with the right) as if this allows for more dexterity and as a result, more control (although some recommend pulling down and pushing up with one hand).

For both race car drivers and yourself, more dexterity and control means a better driving experience. In terms of safety, you can weave around obstacles such as potholes, or distracted drivers instantaneously. Also, sharp turns that require plenty of stability won’t faze you.

  1. Regaining control after sliding

Remember too, that racing isn’t all about speed, and safety plays a big part in the sport as well. That’s why drivers practice how to escape a slide at length since it can actually happen on a race track. Of course, there’s a difference between sliding and drifting (which is common in some motorsport such as rally racing). Drifting is controlled – sliding is not and since it puts the racer in danger, they must put their eyes where they want the car to stop, turn the wheel in that direction and maintain that position while slowly braking.

For both the race car driver and the average joe, doing so can prevent a collision with another vehicle. However, this technique is even more paramount for the average driver, because other motorists most likely won’t have the skills of a professional racer who can quickly dodge an out-of-control car.

  1. Driving in wet/slippery conditions

Racing in the rain is no doubt riskier than racing on dry pavement. So the race car driver has to keep his vehicle balanced, in order to not spin out on the slippery surface. In motorsports, there’s a “racing line”, which is the path they should follow to complete a course as quickly as possible. However, in rainy weather, racers can’t follow these lines completely, and they’ll have to focus more on finding patches of road that offer the most grip.

Of course, rain can be dangerous both to the racers and regular drivers. But how can you abandon your “racing lines” to find your grip? Well apart from equipping your vehicle with the appropriate tires, you should take your attention off doing the speed limit and trying to beat the amber light. Rather, focus on early braking, maintaining your distance with other cars, and looking out for slick patches of road that may cause skids. The goal here isn’t to get to your point B faster, but to get there safely.

  1. Surviving a tire blowout

Tire blowouts occur on race tracks too. It can be devastating for the driver since it may cost them the chance of a winning title, like what happened to F1 racer Sebastian Vettel last fall. Nevertheless, drivers remain calm and keep their car moving straight until they’re moving slow enough to drive off to the pit stop. They don’t stomp on the brake or try to steer off the road, as this could cause their car to spin out of control, smashing into other vehicles.

This technique can be hard to pull off because it goes against everything your mind is telling you in such a frightening situation. But it can save lives. Again, this driving technique is probably more urgent for the average citizen, because a lot of drivers out there don’t have the reflexes, poise and muscle memory to stay away from you if you’re out of control. So remaining in a straight path will keep you and all those around you safe.

Learning from the masters

There are a ton of racing legends out there who have their own tips on how to drive a car. Of course, classic heroes like Mario Andretti or modern phenoms such Lewis Hamilton have their own tricks which they may not share with you. However, they all follow some basic driving techniques that you can also use. And they’re not only useful for performance, but your safety as well. So the next time you see something about a race car driver, don’t dismiss them as overpaid young men who get to sit all day – their skillset has relevance for you as well.

Talk to us here at Dale Adams about all your performance vehicle needs.

 

A Beginner’s Guide to Buying a Classic Car

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Mark Purtell that was originally posted on artofmanliness.com. 

Many men have the classic car bug hit them at some point in life. Maybe they want that car they dreamed about in high school (or actually drove, and still miss). For others, it’s the idea of taking a rundown classic and restoring it to mint condition. Some guys just like buying investment-grade cars with hopes of profiting off them in the future. No matter what your reasoning for wanting a vintage automobile, before you buy one on a whim, let’s dig into the reasons you might buy a vintage car, along with developing a plan for getting the best car for your budget and lifestyle.

Why Are You Buying a Vintage Auto?

As noted above, people buy vintage vehicles for all kinds of reasons, and being realistic about why you are buying a classic car is essential if you want it to be an enjoyable experience rather than one filled with rancor and regret.

The key is to buy for all the right reasons for you.

For example, you might want to get a 1965 Mustang convertible to go get milkshakes with the family. A rust-bucket/project car, assuming you have the time, money, and dedication to restore it, is going to take several years before it is roadworthy. By that time, your kids are in high school, and they have no interest in hitting the malt shop with Mom and Dad. In this case, a turnkey, ready-to-drive option may be the best bet for you.

If you’re someone with lots of spare time (and perhaps money as well) who enjoys fixing anything mechanical, a full restoration project might fit your profile.

If you want to buy a unique car in immaculate condition with strong investment potential, that car is going to be doing a lot of sitting without much tinkering or driving required. But as I’ll explain next, it’s important to understand that most classic cars don’t actually turn out to be a good investment. 

Most Classic Cars Are Not an Investment

We’ve heard of the guy who doubled his money on a car sitting in his grandmother’s garage, but most attempts to flip a vintage vehicle for profit don’t turn out that way.

The truth is that these old cars are simply that: old cars. They have carrying costs: storage, maintenance, insurance, etc. Depending on the car, these costs can run hundreds to thousands of dollars per year.

And that’s not to mention restoration costs, of both money and time. That Mustang we referenced earlier might require $15,000 in work to get it in the condition you desire and it will still be worth about the same price you paid for it. A 1960s Corvette might cost $40,000, require $60,000 in restoration work, and now be worth $70,000-$90,000. Even if you do the repair work yourself, you might save tens of thousands of dollars in labor costs, but spend hundreds of hours in the garage away from your family. This begs the question: What is your time worth? If you like cranking a wrench on the nights and weekends, go for it. If you are thinking you will spend a couple hours a week working on a project car, you could lose interest long before its appreciated in value.

If your plan is to buy an investment-grade vehicle that you don’t plan to drive but will instead park in a temperature-controlled garage, waiting for demand to push the price up, do your research carefully on what car you buy. For example, many cars from the 1950s and 1960s have had no price appreciation for a decade. One theory is that the collectors, generally aged 60+, who used to desire these cars are either dying or downsizing their collections. Meanwhile, cars that were popular in the late 1970s to 1990s are experiencing price appreciation as the children of this era approach middle age with discretionary income to burn on collector cars.

Where to Buy Your Throwback Machine

Buying a classic car is not the same thing as buying a brand new Honda from the local dealer. You can’t just walk into a dealer, pick your comfort package, engine size, interior/exterior colors, and drive home that day with exactly what you want. To find the car you really desire, it’s going to take some work.

When buying a used car (emphasis added because racing stripes and polished wheels may make it seem new in your mind), constantly remind yourself of the phrase caveat emptor — “buyer beware.”

Buying at Auction

Classic car auctions are sexy. The crowd, the excitement, and the potential to get a deal on your dream machine all sound appealing. Here are some pros and cons for going this route:

Pros:

  • Auctions do a great job bringing in high-end cars that may have never sat in a consignment dealer’s showroom. Some of the most desirable (i.e., expensive cars) have sold at auction rather than by private party or dealer.
  • Auctions can often be accessed via phone or internet, giving you the opportunity to buy a car from the other side of the world.
  • You can get a deal on a car with a no, or low, reserve. If only a few buyers bid on the car, you could walk out with a steal.

Cons:

  • The buyer has limited options for inspection. Aside from walking around the car and maybe hearing it turn over, the chance of a complete inspection is non-existent. Only after you buy the car will you begin to discover all the surprises in the car you just purchased, and remember there are no “do-overs” at auction.
  • The seller and buyer premiums added on to the sale price can tack on 10-25% in fees to the price of the car compared to a private party transaction.

Buying From a Dealer

Just like people, there are good dealers and bad dealers. Most classic car dealers run a consignment shop, where private car sellers leave their cars on the lot for sale. In return for handling the advertising and drumming up a buyer, the dealer receives a percentage of the sale proceeds. Some dealers will buy the car directly from the seller and attempt to flip it for their own profit.

Pros:

  • Good dealers will run their inventory through an inspection before selling it. A reputable dealer will have no problem with you conducting an in-depth inspection of the car along with bringing in an outside inspector to verify that the car they advertise is the one you are buying.
  • There’s good negotiating power. The dealer will try to get you to come up on price, but they’ll also try to get the seller to come down on price; they want to get the deal done. This is a negotiation, so do not be afraid to go in 20-25% below the asking price when starting out.

Cons:

  • Dealers are in the business of turning over inventory. They often do not have intimate knowledge of the car’s history outside of what an inspection might garner. 
  • Dealers are middlemen. This means you indirectly pay a higher price because the seller will be paying a commission of 10-15% of the total sale price.

Buying From a Private Party

This method takes a lot more work than buying from a dealer or auction, but you can get a great deal on a classic car if you put the time into your search.

Pros:

  • You deal directly with the seller. Oftentimes, they will be long-time owners, or at least more intimately know the history of the car. Some of these owners look at selling their car as giving away a child and want it to go to a good home. These collectors are the ones you want to buy from because the car’s condition will generally reflect the seller’s passion.
  • You can get a much better price here without the fees of a dealer or auction house acting as a go-between.

Cons:

  • This method takes work. You need to scrounge for sale ads on every car site you can find. Many sellers only list on 1-2 sites and assume that is good enough to market the car. Unless you are searching all the classic car classified sites, you might miss your deal.
  • You might be more likely to blindly trust a passionate private seller. Each claim the owner makes about the car should be verified, if possible. If the deal does not pass the smell test, keep moving. No one is going to sell you a rare 1970 G.T.O. Judge for half off market prices just to avoid paying auction or dealer fees. What he is probably selling is a G.T.O. he’s made to look like a Judge in order to outsmart an uneducated buyer.

Use an Inspector Whenever You Can

When you’re buying from a dealer or private seller, and have the possibility of bringing in an inspector to look at the car, it really behooves you to do so.

An inspector acts as a second set of eyes that will make sure the car is exactly as described in the dealer’s sales literature or private owner’s claims. An inspector also functions as an important reality check: reining in your emotions is important to make sure you’re not overcome with the excitement of getting a classic car and end up with an overpriced toy needing more work and money than you’re comfortable with.

To find a good inspector, ask for recommendations at local car clubs or classic car dealers. Another option is calling a restoration shop that specializes in the car you are buying and hire them to do the inspection. Even if the shop can’t do it, they may be able to suggest someone who could.

In addition to hiring an inspector, you will also be well served by taking the car to a mechanic who can make sure it runs correctly too.

A Short Word on Prices 

Classic cars come in all prices and conditions. You can pick up a near-mint condition Model T for around $10,000-$15,000. You can’t even find a project Porsche in that price range.

As a broad rule, more money spent upfront will save you gobs of money throughout the life of the car. As you scroll through classic car ads, you will often see statements such as “$75,000 invested, asking $45,000 or best offer.” Is the seller lying? Probably not. Restoration projects, especially those done at professional shops, involve hundreds or thousands of labor hours plus parts. Once the work is done, the owner may drive it around for a couple years, get bored with it, and dump it on the market. This is where you move in to save yourself thousands of dollars.

A collector car usually has no functional or practical value. Just like you wouldn’t depend on a 1982 Commodore 64 for finishing your work report, you’re not going to jump in your 1982 DeLorean DMC-12 to pick up your son from basketball practice in the middle of a snowstorm. In many ways classic cars are valued and priced the same way as other fine art is: condition and demand. Scarcity may add to the allure of a car, but does not always guarantee a high price. Compare this to how your kindergartener’s art project is one-of-a-kind, but won’t be on the block at Sotheby’s next to a Klimt or Dali.

What Car to Buy — A Few Ideas for Starters 

To continue to read the rest of this article please visit the original post at artofmanliness.com here. 

Thanks for reading!

Dale Adams

Top 5 Signs of Engine Trouble

Original Article on HowStuffWorks.com BY AKWELI PARKER KRISTEN HALL-GEISLER

Do you know the early warning signs of engine trouble? See more pictures of engines.

Do you know the early warning signs of engine trouble?

We've all done it: While sitting in traffic, maybe at a red light, you listen. Is that a whirring sound? What is that whirring sound? Where is it coming from? Is it from my car? Is it in the engine? Please don't let it be in the engine. It's just the air conditioner. Or maybe it's not even my car. The car in the next lane looks like a real clunker. I bet it's that car.

Repeat with any sound, any smell, any weird feeling you get while driving. Car jerking around? They need to pave this road. Engine smells funny? That's because this whole town smells. Check engine light come on? It's probably a loose gas cap. And of course, if you hear something strange, turn up the radio and drown it out.

Because otherwise, these things can give you a panic attack. With every sound, smell, and insistent light on the dashboard, we see days without a car to get to work and money flying out of our wallets like winged monkeys in little red vests and hats.

Here are a few of the scariest signs of engine trouble, the likely causes. And yes, they almost all require immediate attention -- but there's no need to panic. Unless you actually see those flying monkeys. They're creepy.

5: Warning Lights

A "Check Engine" lamp can signal a variety of issues.

A "Check Engine" lamp can signal a variety of issues.

If your car is working properly, these are what Audra Fordin of "What Women Auto Know" calls "hello, good morning" lights. You fire up the engine and the dashboard lights up like carnival. This is the car's computer checking everything out. One by one, each of the lights turns off and you're ready to drive.

If they don't turn off, though, that's bad. Either very bad or slightly bad, depending on which light remains lit. These lights are connected to sensors that monitor everything your car does. If something seems out of whack, the computer will use these lights to tell you what it is. It can't use its words; it's not KITT, you know.

The lights you'll probably want to pay the most attention to are:

  • Check Oil/Oil Level Low
  • Oil Pressure Low
  • Check Engine

The "Check Engine" lamp is perhaps the most troubling of lights because it could mean so many different things, from "you didn't screw the gas cap on tightly enough" to "look out for pistons flying through the hood and into the stratosphere." The easiest way to find out what this light is telling you is to hook your vehicle up to a scan tool. This diagnostic tool looks a little like an oversized calculator and plugs into a communication port inside the car. After you instruct it to perform the scan, it "speaks" with your car's computers to find out exactly what's prompting the light to turn on.

You can purchase your own tool from an auto parts store for less than $100, but then what? You're probably not going to put on your coveralls and crawl under the hood yourself. Instead, visit a service station, where a technician will use the scan tool to identify the trouble.

4: Doing the Jerk

No, we're not talking about that cool dance where your knees kind of open and close and you move from side to side, and you can get all low and funky with it. We're talking about a car doing the jerk, which is much less cool.

Driving should be free of jerking, surging, or stalling. It should be smooth and easy, more like ballet than Beyonce. What's cool in the club is not cool in an engine.

But if your car is popping and locking, that's a pretty strong sign of engine trouble. It could be due to fouled spark plugs, clogged fuel lines or fuel filter, the main computer reading the driving situation wrong, or many, many other issues.

The last thing you want is for your vehicle to take its own sweet time accelerating, or to give out entirely, as you're merging onto a busy highway with other vehicles barreling down behind you. Likewise, high revving at idle or acceleration that's out of your control are situations you should have a qualified technician investigate and repair as soon as possible.

Preventive maintenance, including regular oil changes and belt replacements at recommended intervals help to keep you out of the danger zone.

3: Rude Noises

A little bit of noise from under the hood is normal.

A little bit of noise from under the hood is normal.

You know how your uncle Barney makes all those sounds at Thanksgiving, and he thinks they're hilarious? Well, if your car ever sounds like Uncle Barney, you've got serious problems.

A tapping or popping that sounds like Barney doing deep knee bends (which never happens), for instance, could indicate detonation taking place within the engine's cylinders. This happens when gasoline ignites prematurely in the combustion chamber of the cylinders and can potentially result in expensive piston damage.

If you hear a grinding noise when you attempt to start your car, your starter motor might need to be adjusted or replaced. If you hear grinding when shifting between gears, it could be transmission replacement time! It's not as fun as it sounds. And if you're driving a manual transmission, do not listen to Uncle Barney when he says, "Grind it 'til you find it."

In most cases, a little bit of noise from either your car or Uncle Barney -- like a mild ticking or clicking -- might be normal. Cars with roller rockers in their valve trains, for instance, emit some ticking noise; and fuel-injected vehicles also produce slightly audible clicks from the injectors [source: 2CarPros.com].

If in doubt, listen intently, try to track down the general area of the noise as best you can and then attempt to explain it in as much detail as you can to a qualified service professional.

2: Foul Smells

Cars rarely smell delightful. They're burning gasoline or diesel fuel, there's hot metal under the hood, and your brother ate a burrito just before he got in the passenger seat. There's not much you can do about your brother besides open all the windows and monitor his lunch intake, but any other automotive smells that make it into the passenger compartment spell trouble.

The scent may signal oil or coolant leaking from their normally closed-loop systems, or it may indicate dangerous exhaust gases invading your car's interior. Car and truck exhaust contains toxic gases such as carbon monoxide, so if the inside of your car smells as if you were standing behind your car, get out and get it fixed. Fight the urge to take a little nap first. So sleepy. That's the carbon monoxide talking, friends. At least open a window on your way to the shop.

The smell of burning rubber could mean you just did an awesome smoky burnout, or it could be telling you that drive belts or accessory belts beneath the hood are damaged, loose, or worn out. It could also mean that a rubber hose carrying important fluids is touching something that it shouldn't -- something that's too hot and is melting the rubber.

In any case, it's a good idea to act sooner rather than later, as these nasty smells could be linked to a much more crucial and expensive component.

1: Smoke Signals

Exhaust smoke can give you clues about what's going on inside of your engine.

Exhaust smoke can give you clues about what's going on inside of your engine.

Smoke can come from the front or back of the car, and it's not good in either case. But the tailpipe will send-up colored smoke in attempt to tell you what the problem is. Here is your secret decoder ring:

Blue smoke: Oil is escaping from its intended passageways within the engine and is being burned along with fuel. Of course, you could always keep adding engine oil to the crankcase to prevent it from being all burned up (and risking serious engine damage), but the smart thing to do would be to take the car in to have any worn or damaged seals repaired [source: Torbjornsen].

White smoke: Water condensation or antifreeze has mixed with the fuel supply. Again, adding coolant or antifreeze to your car's cooling system will keep your car from overheating for as long as you remember to keep feeding the reservoir, but the wise move is to have it checked out as soon as possible.

If the smoke is coming from under your hood, that probably means you ignored white smoke coming out of the tailpipe, and now your engine is overheating. Or maybe you completely forgot to add coolant at all, and the engine overheated. Not that anyone would ever do that. That's ridiculous.

Author's Note: Top 5 Signs of Engine Trouble

I mentioned in that last tip that no one could possibly be so ignorant as to let their car run out of coolant. No one but me, that is. My first car (when I was 17) was a Chevy Chevette. I knew nothing about car maintenance, having only a vague idea about oil changes being somehow necessary. I certainly didn't know about checking fluids, or paying attention to the temperature gauge in the dashboard, or what to do when any warning lights came on. When hot, white smoke billowed from under my cheap hood, I learned very quickly about the price of coolant ignorance. It's expensive to replace an engine, even in a crappy car from the 80s.

Sources

  • com. "Why Is My Engine Making Noise?" (Oct. 13, 2009) http://www.2carpros.com/first_things/why_is_my_engine_making_noise.htm
  • org. "What To Do if the 'Check Engine' Light Goes On." March 2009. (Oct. 12, 2009) http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/cars/new-cars/news/2005/ what-to-do-if-the-check-engine-light-goes-on/overview/index.htm
  • com. "How To Speak Mechanic." (Oct. 12, 2009) http://www.goodwrench.com/Tips/DiagnosingTheProblem.jsp
  • Torbjornsen, Tom. "Smoke From Your Tailpipe? Know the Difference Between White Smoke and Blue Smoke." July 8, 2009. (Oct. 9, 2009) http://autos.aol.com/article/car-smoke
  • Turbo Magazine. "Engine Diagnostics Part Two - Crank, Ignite, Charge." (Oct. 9, 2009) http://blogs.turbomagazine.com/index.html
  • S. Environmental Protection Agency. "On-Board Diagnostics." (Oct. 10, 2009) http://www.epa.gov/otaq/regs/im/obd/index.htm

 

The Carroll Shelby Foundation

The Man Behind The Car—The Carroll Shelby Foundation

Being one of only a few official authorized Shelby mod shops in Canada we are very fortunate to continue to work with Shelby after the passing of their founder and Shelby creator Carroll Shelby in 2012.

As we ourselves at Dale Adams Automotive raise money yearly for the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada with our Powering the Cure Golf Tournament we also wanted to recognize the impact that The Carroll Shelby Foundation has made in the United States through the foundation.

Thanks to the information on Shelby.com we can share this great story.

The Carroll Shelby Foundation is dedicated to providing financial support for children and medical professionals to help overcome life-threatening health issues worldwide and promoting continuing educational development. 

About Carroll Shelby

Carroll Shelby with ChildLegendary racer and automotive manufacturer Carroll Shelby, following years of heart-related difficulties, which culminated in a successful heart transplant, created the Carroll Shelby Children's Foundation in October 1991. The organization is dedicated to providing assistance for acute coronary and kidney care for young people who share many of the same afflictions. 2009 the Foundation took another beat and expanded its reach and became the Carroll Shelby Foundation helping kids from their first heartbeat through their education years.

To date the Carroll Shelby Foundation has helped numerous youngsters undergo major coronary surgeries and help charities and children worldwide raise money for their own fundraising campaigns and provided seed monies to launch healthcare programs and facilities, the Foundation also provides grants to organizations conducting research in the fields of coronary and organ transplant management. The Foundation, expanding its reach, will provide scholarship money to kids dedicated to enhancing their lives through continuing educational opportunities in the automotive field.

Carroll Shelby

Shelby, who waited years before receiving his own heart transplant, was keenly aware of the difficulties and expense involved in heart surgery and the often-lengthy process to locate a suitable donor organ. He created the Foundation because he realized that many needy children would have their lives cut short without some type of financial assistance.

The Carroll Shelby Foundation is a 501 (c) 3 and funding comes from a myriad of programs conducted throughout the year. These programs include, generous donations given in exchange for Carroll's autographs, generous donations from corporate and private sponsors, Ford Motor Company and through his personal appearance fees. In addition, Team Shelby, the Shelby American Automobile Club (SAAC), the Shelby Mustang clubs and the Shelby Dodge clubs all include the Foundation as an active participant and beneficiary of their national and regional convention event proceeds.

The Legacy

Save a life. It's painless.

Last year more than 23,000 patients began new lives thanks to an organ transplant.

About 56 people receive an organ transplant everyday in the United States.

Today more than 80,000 people are awaiting a transplant.

Every 14 minutes another person is added to the transplant list.

In the United States alone, 16 people die each day awaiting their transplant.

Inclusion on the transplant list requires "proof" of payment in advance. Therefore many die before they even make it to the waiting list.

For more information on this great charity please visit Shelby.com.

For information on our charity Powering the Cure Golf Tournament please click here.

Dale Adams Automotive Joins Elite NAPA AUTOPRO Service Centre Designation

Dale Adams Automotive always puts our customers first. To continue to deliver the best service and products to our customers we make sure we are partnering with the best automotive companies. We have now just become one of only 25 automotive service centres in Calgary that are certified NAPA AUTOPRO centres. We are excited to be partnered with such a great company. Here is what it means to be a NAPA AUTOPRO service centre.

ABOUT NAPA AUTOPRO SERVICE CENTRES

NAPA AUTOPRO is a dedicated team of highly trained technicians using state-of-the-art technology who are ready to provide you with unequalled maintenance, quality customer care and a range of services designed to keep your vehicle young for a long, long time. Thanks to our unparalleled expertise and a commitment to going the extra mile, you can rest easy knowing that you and your car will be taken care of from start to finish. WHO WE ARE Since 1984, NAPA AUTOPRO has been the place Canadian drivers turn to for mechanical repair and vehicle maintenance services. Today, we have service centres across the country offering expert help on everything from tune-ups and brake work to air conditioning and suspension.

WHAT WE DO

When you bring your vehicle in for maintenance or repair, we guarantee a level of service uncommon in the industry. That means appointments tailored to your schedule, detailed safety and maintenance inspections, no work or billing surprises, manufacturer-recommended services, responsible environmental practices, and recall alerts. Plus, we only use high-quality, competitively priced parts so you know you’re getting your money’s worth. And we back it all with a personalized, competitive service warranty that works in your favour.

WHY CHOOSE US

Our facilities are staffed with professionals who are trained to offer exceptional service and quality repair work day in, day out. So if your car is brand new, a timeless classic, or somewhere in between, we have the experience, equipment and training to get the job done right.

Contact us for all your vehicle needs, we are here for you and have been for over 40 years. Support local!

It's easy to forget about your tires or just rely on what came with your vehicle. However, we want to help educate you a bit. Instead of a long essay, we figured it easier to use some professional videos that highlight 3 key points.

New Tires vs. Worn Tires

How much difference does it make? Let's watch a very cool video by Engineering Explained with help from our friends at Michelin Tires. If you want more details on this we encourage you to visit the Michelin website here: https://www.michelinman.com/longlastingperformance

 

Summer vs Winter vs All Season - What Tires Should You Buy?

We get this question all the time here at Dale Adams. "Are All Season tires good enough for winter?".  Always consider where you live and the conditions. It can cost you a bit more but consider that winter tires usually have a 5-7 year life span. What does Engineering Explained say. Watch and learn.

 

What to watch out for buying tires - Industry Insider Report

We are always very transparent with all of our customers but we encourage you to watch this ABC News story about what you should watch out for from salespeople when buying ties. Great tips.

 

We are here to help.

We here at Dale Adams work with multiple tire vendors and we always put our customers first. If you have questions about tires come talk to us and we will make sure we meet your needs and your budget.

Contact us for more information.

  1. If your car is hot inside you can cool it down by 5-10 degrees really quickly.

    hot in carThough you look like you are a bit crazy, if your car is sweltering hot inside here's the trick to cool it down really quick.

    Simply roll down your driver's side window all the way, then get out of your car and walk around to the driver's side of the car, or better yet have a passenger help. Then just open and close the passenger door about 10 times to create an air flow inside the car. Boo yeah, much cooler. You don't have to close the door all the way so don't feel like you have to slam the door.

  2. Contrary to popular belief, you actually save gas by using the air conditioning while driving fast rather than rolling down the windows.

    For those who want to save on gas costs many times we have heard that driving with the AC off will save on gas costs. Though true at slower and moderate city type driving, at faster speeds-like on a highway-it is more economical on gas to actually roll the windows up and use the AC. Show this article to the disbelievers.

  3. You can drive for free if restaurants are nice and let you have their used cooking oil.

    classic deep fryerIf you drive a vehicle with a diesel engine, it is possible to drive it without ever buying any diesel. With the addition of a conversion kit, you can actually run such vehicles on vegetable oil—such as the used cooking oil discarded by fast-food restaurants each day. Since you’re basically burning trash, your fuel bill can be reduced almost to zero. Plus, you’re both eliminating waste and running on renewable, 100% bio-based fuel. The potential downside: according to some users, it makes your exhaust smell like french fries.

  4. Horsepower doesn't really relate to the power a horse can exert.

    horse powerBy the formal definition of horsepower-the power required to lift 33,000 pounds by one foot in one minute-a real horse musters only about 0.7 horsepower. Maybe the horses just need to install their own supercharger?

  5. Maybe we should let Big Brother drive.

    Though we have to get over our control issues and it would be less fun for us that enjoy driving, society would be better off if we let the computers take over. Self-driving cars could improve highway flow by regulating distances between cars and ease urban congestion by automating the search for parking (which causes up to three-quarters of city traffic). There would be very little traffic, less accidents and we could nap like champions to get rid of those extra adult beverages you had on a work night.

We hope you enjoyed these little factoids of ours. Please feel free to share any of your tips about the cars we all use and love.

The Dale Adams Crew

Do you love vintage and performance and all things cars? Well then we have the career for you. Dale Adams Automotive is hiring.

We are looking for the following:

  • Licensed Automotive Services Technicians (or a 2nd or 3rd year apprentice)
    This is a full time position and we offer competitive wages based on experience and certifications.

  • Experienced Parts People
    This is also a full time position and offers competitive wages based on experience.

Dale Adams is a legend in Calgary and has been operating for over 40 years now in Calgary. We recently expanded and we are busier than ever so we need the best in the business to help us maintain our highest quality standards and exceptional service.

Though we offer complete maintenance and services for all makes and models, Dale and his team are world-famous for their work on classic vintage vehicles and excel in performance vehicles. 

As the only Official Shelby Mod shop and trusted with the most amazing vehicles you'll ever see we want the best people that really care about their work and share our passion for these vehicles.

This is no ordinary garage.

If you'd like to work on cars like these in the photos below, then apply today by sending your resume to derekadams@daleadams.com

 

 

"Like a Boss" simply stated, is the best way to describe this truck. With it's aggressive and tailored looks, the Boss sets itself apart from the rest of the pack. Equipped with a 5.0L V8 Supercharged engine pumping out 700+ horsepower to get your adrenaline pumping, this truck has an attitude all on it's own.

Download the Ford F150 Boss Edition Specifications Sheet